It’s Raining Supermen: ‘Crisis on Infinite Earths’ Part Two

Kevin Conroy as Bruce Wayne. (Photo: CW)
Kevin Conroy as Bruce Wayne. (Photo: CW)

Give a man a book, he’ll go on a multiverse killing spree.

That’s the outcome of part two of “Crisis on Infinite Earths,” an hour brimming with some fantastic action, terrific fan-service and several scene-stealing performances. It’s almost as if it’s a different show, and it is, it’s “Batwoman.”

Don’t knock it ’til you watched it.

Lex Luthor is very much alive, with his own part to play, the Monitor assures the assembled heroes.

Lex immediately steals the magical Book of Destiny and sets out to destroy every Superman everywhere. The Monitor is surprisingly chill about his cosmic vendetta.

Now this is a problem because our heroes have been charged with rounding up the legendary heroes – paragons –  who can save the multiverse.

Continue reading “It’s Raining Supermen: ‘Crisis on Infinite Earths’ Part Two”

Crime is All in the Family on CW’s ‘Batwoman’

Ruby Rose as Batwoman. (Photo: CW)
Ruby Rose as Batwoman. (Photo: CW)

Warning: The following contains spoilers for the first two episodes of CW’s “Batwoman.”

“Gotham,” “Pennyworth,” now “Batwoman”: How long before Animal Planet and Comedy Central team to make “The Adventures of Bat-Hound”? (Hollywood! Call me!) What do we have to do to get a proper Batman TV series?

Warner continues to find another way to milk the Bat-universe sans the Dark Knight in this latest addition to CW’s stable of Greg Berlanti/DC collaborations.

“Batwoman” owes so much to Christopher Nolan’s “Dark Knight,” everyone involved should spend their weekends doing yard work at Nolan’s home.

Continue reading “Crime is All in the Family on CW’s ‘Batwoman’”

Batwoman Forever

Batwoman races into action.
Batwoman races into action.

Can a woman have a Bat-career?

That was the question DC Comics struggled with in the 1950s.

The Dark Knight’s first and best female companion debuted in “Detective Comics” No. 233, cover date July 1956, in the story “Batwoman.”

Trapeze artist, motorcycle rider and heiress Kathy Kane donned cape and cowl to fight crime like her idol.  Her career seemingly ended after her first mission when Batman discovered her secret identity. He warned her that if he could do it, criminals could do it as well, jeopardizing her life.

Never mind that he is the World’s Greatest Detective and not the average Gotham crook or that he could have helped Batwoman shore up her security. No, she had to know her place.

And Batwoman agreed she would retire.

Thankfully, that’s not the whole story. Even in the 1950s, Batwoman proved to be too popular to sit at home. So DC had to settle this story hole it had dug.

Continue reading “Batwoman Forever”