Batwoman Forever

Batwoman races into action.
Batwoman races into action.

Can a woman have a Bat-career?

That was the question DC Comics struggled with in the 1950s.

The Dark Knight’s first and best female companion debuted in “Detective Comics” No. 233, cover date July 1956, in the story “Batwoman.”

Trapeze artist, motorcycle rider and heiress Kathy Kane donned cape and cowl to fight crime like her idol.  Her career seemingly ended after her first mission when Batman discovered her secret identity. He warned her that if he could do it, criminals could do it as well, jeopardizing her life.

Never mind that he is the World’s Greatest Detective and not the average Gotham crook or that he could have helped Batwoman shore up her security. No, she had to know her place.

And Batwoman agreed she would retire.

Thankfully, that’s not the whole story. Even in the 1950s, Batwoman proved to be too popular to sit at home. So DC had to settle this story hole it had dug.

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To Celebrate the ‘Doom Patrol’ TV Show, Let’s Revisit a Silver Age Classic

The gang's all here: Negative Man, Robotman, Crazy Jane, Elasti-Woman ...and Cyborg? (Photo: DC Universe)
The gang’s all here: Negative Man, Robotman, Crazy Jane, Elasti-Woman … and Cyborg? (Photo: DC Universe)

If you had to guess what DC property would go on to get its own TV show, “Doom Patrol” would probably be waaaaaay down the list, just past “Prez” and “Sugar & Spike.”

Yet here we are: DC Universe, Warner Bros.’ streaming service for all things DC, launched the TV show earlier this month, and after just the first two episodes, I’m impressed. It stars Brendan Fraser as Robotman and Matt Bomer as Negative Man. It leans heavily into the Grant Morrison run, probably the title’s artistic zenith, but it also keeps elements of the original, most notably, the wonderful Rita Farr, Elasti-Woman.

Cyborg is also in it.

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Get Your Treats with a JSA Halloween!

Most of the Justice Society has vanished.

While the senior members of the team search for their comrades, the junior heroes – Star-Spangled Kid and Jakeem Thunder – are left alone in the mansion on Halloween night.

What could go wrong?

For starters, there’s the head from the Statue of Liberty – which lands like an atom bomb outside their front door.

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And the World Shall Call Them – Substitutes!

The Legion of Substitute Heroes
“The Legion of Super-Failures” does not have much of a ring to it.

DC’s Legion fans are a passionate bunch.

We’ll debate most useless member, best creative team and favorite reboot.

But you don’t get a lot of guff about one of the admittedly goofier elements of Legion Lore:

The Legion of Substitute Heroes.

There just might be a good reason for that.

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The Justice Society Returns in – Wait. What?

In action again, finally, the Justice Society of America.
In action again, finally, the Justice Society of America.

How many years has it been since DC gave us an original Justice Society of America story?

The team was blanked out of existence with the dreary New 52 relaunch in 2011. DC’s Rebirth in 2016 has welcomed and played with the notion of the multiverse, and gave us back the first and best Flash, Jay Garrick, if only for a moment.

“Doomsday Clock,” the miniseries written by Geoff Johns, seems prepped to give us the team back, if we can ever get down to the last tick.

So imagine the surprise when a DC book hit the stands this week with the JSA in all their glory on the cover.

Continue reading “The Justice Society Returns in – Wait. What?”