To Celebrate ‘Wonder Woman,’ DC makes Golden Age Fans an Offer They Can’t Refuse

Golden Age greatness: Green Lantern, the Flash and Wonder Woman in one comic.
Golden Age greatness: Green Lantern, the Flash and Wonder Woman in one comic.

In honor of its latest blockbuster film “Wonder Woman,” DC released last week an astonishing amount of Golden Age comics in its comics app.

I’m tempted to say “unleashed,” only because I’m feeling giddy about discovering scores of comics that haven’t been available for decades.

And you don’t have to be a Wonder Woman fan to love this material.

New to the app: “Wonder Woman” Nos. 8-15, “Comic Cavalcade” Nos. 1-13, and “Sensation Comics” Nos. 10-40.

“Comic Cavalcade” and “Sensation Comics” were anthology titles in the 1940s that carried the adventures of a multitude of mystery men, including some Justice Society members.

Green Lantern soars into action in stories not seen in decades.
Green Lantern soars into action in stories not seen in decades.

“Comic Cavalcade” was a giant book even by the standards of the ’40s, running over 90 pages for a wallet-busting 15 cents. DC reprinted the first three issues in a gorgeous archive a few years back, but with the archive line dead, hope likewise flatlined that we’d ever see these stories.

Flash and Green Lantern co-star here, along with such heroes as Sargon the Sorcerer and Red, White and Blue.

The run of “Sensation,” unlike the previous issues released digitally, includes features with Wildcat and Mr. Terrific, along with the Black Pirate and somebody named the Gay Ghost.

Wildcat punches the lights out of crime in 'Sensation Comics.'
Wildcat punches the lights out of crime in ‘Sensation Comics.’

The scans run the gamut from good to looking as if somebody xeroxed an old copy – which is pretty much what DC did in some instances, blotches and all.

I didn’t look at the “Wonder Woman” issues: I’m not a great fan of this era. As the “Sensation” and “Cavalcade” stories in this lot demonstrate, creator William Moulton Marston liked to live out some of his fantasies on paper. Wonder Woman gets tied up. A lot.

Wonder Woman. In chains. This happens out about twice in any story of this era.
Wonder Woman. In chains. This happens out about twice in any story of this era.

Given that most of this material has never been reprinted and hasn’t seen the light of day in 75 years – and costs only 99 cents for a single issue running approximately 60 (“Sensation”) to 90 pages (“Comic Cavalcade”), I’d say this is one damn sweet deal.

It’s all the more surprising because finding anything older than 1990 on the DC app is like coming across the last unicorn from the planet Krypton.

There’s so much Golden Age greatness here – a mix of adventure, humor and benevolence all packed into eight to 10 page stories.

And I’m really digging such forgotten heroes as the Black Pirate and the Gay Ghost, the latter a murdered 18th century Irish man who fights for justice beyond the grave. With the ability to take over someone else’s body, he’s easy to peg as an inspiration for Deadman.

Beware the Gay Ghost! Oh, stop laughing.
Beware the Gay Ghost! Oh, stop laughing.

If you’re tempted to make jokes about that name – well, who isn’t? – check out this highlight from a Mr. Terrific story in which the man of 1,000 talents reveals one of them is beauty makeovers.

Mr. Terrific cleans up.
Yeah, I’m thinking Mr. Terrific didn’t earn his JSA membership this way. But I could be wrong.

You also can find these releases on the ComiXology app as well as on Amazon for the Kindle and Fire tablets.

One thought on “To Celebrate ‘Wonder Woman,’ DC makes Golden Age Fans an Offer They Can’t Refuse

  1. Pingback: That Amazing Amazon | The Crusty Curmudgeon's Comic Classics

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